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Richard Landers

Artist Statement

I have been involved in the glass industry since 1981, I have been a full time artist since 1987, and a founding member of the Art Glass Association of NZ. I operate from my purpose-built studio and gallery in Omata, where visitors are always welcome to view and experience the techniques I have developed.

I have lived in Taranaki all my life, where my work is influenced by the local environment we experience during our everyday lives. Taranaki is a place of wind, waves, and weaving landscapes, in it is a constant variety of colour, light, and movement. It is these aspects of Taranaki that I feel and portray in my work. My work looks, 'not to duplicate, but to describe, and make visible.'

Delicately I balance my time between firstly, my recycled glass sculpture, which is made from colourless float glass, yet borrows light and hues from its surrounding environment, exploiting repeated simple shape.
And secondly, my Leaded Glass installations, which involve coloured and textured glass incorporated (usually) in flat panels, part of an architectural setting.

One day I may be working on a period villa, perhaps the next on a brand new home, and sometimes, on Century old Stained Glass in our churches.
These are predominantly 'made to order' commissioned works.
On the other hand my Sculptural work you're more likely to see in my studio or selected galleries on your travels.-

Working within these two totally opposite disciplines is something that I find not only refreshing technically, but also a great motivational tool, and a surprising source of inspiration.

Phone

027 622 8131

Richard Landers

Open Gateway

Price

POA

Height

500 (mm)

Width

500 (mm)

Depth

130 (mm)

Medium

Laminated Recycled Float Glass.

Artwork Artist Statement

At a time where the increasing need to consider our consumer footprint is ever prevalent, the art industry is no exception – I became an artist to fulfil a fascination with form and light through my lifelong medium of glass – along the way I discovered the potential in the creative and innovative re-cycling of the material itself. As one of the few glass artists in New Zealand, I’m self-taught in recycling window glass into contemporary abstract sculptures that reflect and manipulate light. As an artist, I seek to transform recycled sheet glass into sculptures that are not only visually pleasing, but capture the public's imagination and stimulates contemplation.

‘OPEN GATEWAY’ is a piece that employs reflection and light to lure one in. Made from recycled window glass, reclaimed from a local retail shop window, this piece loosely mimics the ‘stride’ – inviting you to come along. Its jagged edge and strong triangle arch evoke a sense of mystery and overwhelming ghostliness. Resembling an ancient cave or shelter, the piece suggests a feeling of caution, a pause for risk, before entering on a journey. It suggests a beginning or an ending – looking forward or back – coming in or leaving. To what direction you take is interpreted by the viewer themselves

Open Gateway
Open Gateway
Open Gateway
Open Gateway
Open Gateway

Hope

Price

POA

Height

370 (mm)

Width

420 (mm)

Depth

150 (mm)

Medium

Laminated Recycled Float Glass.

Artwork Artist Statement

Originally a stained glass artist, the offcuts from lead lighting inspired my interest in the negative and positive space created when cutting shapes and lines. When designing a piece, I’ve learned a habit of reversing, inverting and repeating to see what is hiding in these ‘spaces’ that I have not yet discovered. Each sculpture formulates in my mind from an original idea, which develops into expression, an architectural shape or symmetrical form and with this reveals the potential of both a positive and negative construct. For every negative there has to be a positive. Traditionally, the positive space is the part of the art work where it is all going on, the subject, detail, form, everything. In turn, it is surrounded by negative space – this is where the true interest lies for me. In this circumstance, our brain determines which area to recognise as positive or negative space to then interpret what we are seeing as the recognised form. There’s an Arthur Koestler quote captures my design process, “The more original a discovery, the more obvious it seems afterwards.” I may begin with a project concentrating on the positive shape, but end up developing a sculpture from both the positive and negative. It’s about discovering new forms and shapes throughout the process – new ways of seeing things – ultimately creating things that didn’t exist at first, but so obviously should have once discovered. ‘HOPE’ is a piece that employs both negative and positive space in a rhythm that ebbs and flows with repetitive lines. Made from recycled window glass, salvaged from a residential glazing retro-fit, the piece evokes a sense of reflection on what has been and gone. The repetition of the overlapping curves evoke a sense of mixed feelings, provoking glimpses of ones inner self-pondering. The space between these ebbs and flows draws one to contemplate that there is just no way things are going to just fall back into place, whilst the slanting rake of the piece draws the eye, and the mind, in a forward direction. And, with that, the healing begins.

Hope
Hope
Hope
Hope
Hope
Hope